Tag Archives: #BurlON

Battery Care - Winter prep

Getting a Charge out of your Car's Battery There's nothing but a loud buzzing noise coming from under the hood when you try to start your car. Jumper cables get you up and scurrying to work--but you need another jump to get home. Time to pull some maintenance on the battery. Regular maintenance on your car's battery will extend it's life and save you money. Automotive batteries have a finite life span. Undercharging, overcharging and heat all team up to degrade your battery. Poor electrical connections make it more difficult for even a good battery to do its job. And again, shorten the useful life span of the battery. ALL CHARGED UP Start any battery maintenance program by checking open-cell voltage, either with a dedicated battery tester or a voltmeter. With the battery fully charged and all electrical drains-dome light, warning buzzer, etc.-shut down, the voltage across the terminals should be 12.5 to 12.6 volts. If the battery is not completely charged, but s ... read more

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Maintenance

Winter Tire Sipes

To better decide what kind of a tire you need, it’s wise to understand how traction works. We would all like a tire that grips well year-round in all conditions, wears well and is inexpensive. That tire does not exist because many of the things that we want in one tire are engineering contradictions. On a microscopic level, a tire is not smooth. The tread face looks like the Rocky Mountains – sharp, jagged peaks and deep valleys between them create a hostile-looking surface. That’s good because the road surface is not smooth, either – it mimics the contours of the tire tread. These two rough surfaces interlock, the tire rotates and there is grip to move the car forward. And to ensure that the rubber fills in the road surface, it needs to be soft.That means the ideal tire is just a big, black, soft rubber ball. But wait – we want the tire to last, so we cannot make it as soft as is ideal. That would be a racing slick: extremely grippy for a very short ... read more

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Tires

Winter Tire Minus Sizing gets true cold weather performance

Winter Tire MINUS SIZING Gets true PERFORMANCE FOR OUR WINTER SEASON. Original Equipment tire and wheel sizes have become larger and wider for better looks and performance in the last few years. Unfortunately these new performance based packages are not ideal for winter driving. So if you’re likely to drive your vehicle in the snow during winter, you’ll want tires and wheels in sizes that help put the laws of physics on your side by “minus” sizing. What is Minus Sizing? Minus sizing means using smaller diameter wheels with narrower, higher profile tires (but still maintaining your vehicles original equipment needs). By doing so, better deep snow traction is achieved, and can also result in great savings on Winter Tire & Wheel Packages. In addition, higher profile tire sizes feature taller sidewalls and smaller diameter wheels that resist damages associated with winter road hazards. Benefits of Minus Sizing Minus sizing packages can be created through our ... read more

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Tires

Engine Coolant Technology - Cold Climate Needs

An Introduction to Coolant Technology What is Engine Coolant and What Does It Do? An engine coolant is a heat transfer fluid designed to remove excess heat from an internal combustion engine. It also serves to prevent freezing and most importantly protection from corrosion. An operating engine typically converts only one third of the energy derived through the combustion of fuel into work that moves the vehicle. The other two thirds is converted into heat, of which one third goes out with the exhaust. This leaves the remaining third in the engine block, necessitating the need for a coolant to adsorb this heat, transport it to the radiator and dissipate it into to the environment. Through the removal of this heat by the coolant fluid, the engine is able to operate in an efficient manner. Therefore engine coolant is a generic term used to describe fluids that remove heat from an engine, in effect “cooling” the engine. Not all fluids are efficient heat tran ... read more

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Maintenance

Hot weather affects battery life

When you think of a dead car battery, you probably think about it being the dead of winter. You try to start your car one frigid morning and nothing happens. It's true that battery failures can occur in cold weather but that's not usually what has caused the problem. The drain on the battery's resources most likely occurred during the summer's hot weather. According to the Car Care Council a group representing automotive repair shops, your battery is more likely to fail in summer than in winter. "Summer heat is the real culprit," said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. "Many battery problems start long before the temperatures drop. Heat, more than cold, shortens battery life." Doesn't last forever No battery lasts forever. When you buy one, the label usually tells you how long you can expect it to last. Five to 7 years is not unusual as long as the battery is operated under normal conditions. Extremely hot weather and overcha ... read more

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Maintenance

Increased safety with working signal and brake lights

The Long and Lighted Road: Lighting and Driving Brake and Turn Signals Automotive Signal Lights Although motorists often complain that some drivers don't know they exist or how to use them, all cars these days come equipped with blinking turn signals letting the car behind you know what you're up to. That certainly wasn't the case with the earliest cars, though. I still remember drivers using standard hand signals into the early sixties — you know, the ones you had to learn to pass your driver's test: for left you put your left arm straight out the window parallel to the ground, for right you rested your left elbow on the window, raising your forearm up with your hand open. And if you wanted to stop you signaled that intention, as well, by putting your left arm out parallel to the road and angling it downward. These hand signals were required whether it was sunny and fair or pouring buckets. Drivers of early historical cars, in fact, still have to know and use ... read more

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Safety

Keyless FOB battery - the heart of the matter

Unlock the Door With a Dead Fob OK, put that rock down you picked up while you considered breaking the window. Before we get too far, do you have OnStar or another similar service for your vehicle? If so, call that service and they will unlock your car remotely. If you don’t, try holding your dead fob up against the driver’s door handle and pulling. Try pressing the fob unlock icon while pulling the handle. If that fails, look closely at the fob. If it has a leather jacket on it, remove that. Almost all automakers hide a small mechanical key inside the fob. There is usually a small lever or trick to getting that little key to pop out. If you can expose the little mechanical key, you can then insert it into the lock opening in the driver’s door, and you’re in. If by chance you have a Ford product remember that many of those models also have a strip of numbers that allow you to input a code and unlock the car. If what we have suggested does not work, c ... read more

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Maintenance

Wiper Blade Replacement

Windscreen wipers are an invaluable part of any vehicle, providing the driver with a clear, unobstructed view of the road just when it is needed most. Whether it is rain, sleet, snow or even dust or leaves which are covering your windscreen, the wiper blades will quickly and efficiently clear the obstruction, meaning you can continue your journey in safety. However, of all the parts of a car which are subject to wear and tear, windscreen wipers are perhaps the most fragile. Manufactured from thin rubber, they are designed to operate smoothly on the windscreen without damaging the surface of the glass, yet despite their fragility they are often required on a daily basis, possibly for long periods of time, during wet weather. In winter they become frozen to the glass and in summer they are used to help to clean the windscreen, while being subjected to high temperatures. It is hardly surprising, therefore, that windscreen wipers do not last indefinitely and require regul ... read more

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Safety

How to clean your aluminum rims

Nothing promotes and preserves the value of your vehicle like regular washing. The best efforts often focus on those eye catching wheel accessories. It’s a shiny detail that can ready add to the look of your vehicle, and add some real punch to the resale value of any car. However, aluminum rims do tend to get chalky after a while. The constant abrasion from swirling dust, effects of road salt and tar, and oxidation from the atmosphere doesn’t let them retain their brilliance indefinitely. Fortunately, uncoated aluminum rims are thick and the shine can be restored to them by polishing. Polishing is really nothing more than super fine sanding. Rims that have been exposed to the elements over time take on a chalky appearance and if allowed to continue, develop pits in the polished surface. The only way to get rid of that is by removing the offending layer. A polishing compound that is designed for alloy metals will eliminate the haze and pits. If the polish is too abrasive ... read more

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Maintenance

Old tires can lead to trouble

Old Tires can lead to trouble Recent news reports about old tires failing has experts asking if tires should have expiration dates the same as many other products. Why? Because old tires are failing and killing people! In a letter released September 22, 2003, a private safety group called Strategic Safety asked the National Highway Traffic & Safety Admin. (NHTSA) to investigate the problem of tire aging. The group says they have documented at least 20 accidents caused by old tires blowing out, 10 of which resulted in fatalities. Most of the lawsuits involving these tread separation accidents have been on tires that were six or more years old. The group says the NHTSA should have a new rule requiring tire manufacturers to put expiration dates on all new tires. REPLACE OLD TIRES Strategic Safety says based on their findings, motorists should replace tires that are ... read more

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Tires