Burlington Auto Repair

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Spring is just around the corner, time to think about your tires!

Spring is just around the corner, time to think about your tires!

Winter is almost over and with the many snow storms we've experienced in Burlington this winter, it's refreshing to think that it will all be over soon. In our industry, temperature changes and seasons passing means it's time to think about seasonal tire changeover. I know, I know, not the most fun thing to tackle on your agenda this spring, but a necessity to ensure your safety and those of others on the road. Since we're pretty good at all things tires and mechanical service, we've prepared a few tips and tricks to help you check this off your spring honey-do list! Goodbye Winter, Hello Spring. Tips to help you with your seasonal tire changeover! You need a nice spring clean up! At The Auto Station, we really pride ourselves with offering the best service to our customers and that means offering a car wash to our customers as they receive service. Make it easy on yourself and sign-up for our Tire Storage program ... read more

Categories:

Tire Information

Symptoms of a leaking gas Cap

Leaky Gas Cap? The check engine light often leaves the driver wondering if the vehicle will be reliable enough to get either to a service garage or back home . Often the reason the light is on is to provide a simple warning to inspect a system for condition. In fact the most often reason this light illuminates is simply an improper seal of the fuel cap. The gas cap is a simple but vital component that is found on virtually every car and truck on the road. The purpose is to provide a removable seal that prevents dirt, debris, and road dust for entering the gas line system. This cap also part of the the vehicle's evaporative emission control system. As fuel vapour in the gas tank evaporates the "evap" system is designed and to hold captive and use these fumes in combustion. As this cap is frequently removed to permit fueling, the seal can wear out over time and will present a few symptoms that can alert the driver to the potential issue. 1) Check Engine Ligh ... read more

Categories:

Maintenance

Keep your car bottom clean

Rusting Away? Our cars are exposed to numerous dangers; theft, crash, abuse, improper maintenance and the like, but an equally dangerous but more insidious risk is simple rust. Virtually every vehicle is going to have some rust on it somewhere, sometime. The combination of complex sheet metal work, with lots of hidden nooks and crannies, has led to the construction of some vehicles that are notorious "rust buckets". Many manufacturers have taken steps to slow rusting, but most of their rust control systems have failed or proved inadequate. So the problem remains: How does the typical car owner control rust? There are three main areas of a car's structure that can suffer potential damage. The areas of concern are: 1. Engine and Trunk Compartments Corrosion and rust can cause leaks in the air intake systems, reducing their capacity. Connectors, both mechanical and electrical, can be very problematic, because these kinds of failures may be intermittent and difficult to dia ... read more

Categories:

Maintenance

How Winter Conditions Can Affect Your Exhaust System

How Winter Conditions Can Affect Your Exhaust System Your vehicle’s exhaust system is an important part and should be checked at least once a year. When winter comes, you have to be careful of damages to your exhaust system from icy road conditions. If something in the road causes damage, you will need to get a muffler and exhaust repair quickly to avoid any dangerous effects from harmful gases getting inside your car. Damage to the Exhaust and Muffler The exhaust system and muffler are typically mounted on the bottom rear of most vehicles. At any time, especially during winter driving conditions, these can be damaged by potholes, large bumps, as well as debris in the road such as ice chunks. Driving on frequent short trips is the worst thing you can do for your exhaust system in the cold weather. When it is cold outside, the first 20 minutes of your drive are hardest on your car ... read more

Categories:

Maintenance

Tire Pressure Light Nights

Tire Pressure Light Nights

TIRE PRESSURE LIGHT NIGHTS Once temperatures drop, your car's computer may be warning you about low tire pressure. The tire pressure monitor light first started showing up in luxury cars in the late 90’s but now is standard in all cars sold in the United States as of Sept. 01, 2007. For those that haven't seen this system in action, it is time to introduce you to the Tire Pressure Monitor System (TPMS) and the sometimes pesky tire pressure monitor light. Tire Pressure Monitor Light often show up a concern as we come out of fall and winter arrives our temperatures begin to drop drastically over night. When it comes to our cars, steep temperature drops can trigger a sign of fall that we don’t welcome: a yellow or orange low tire pressure warning light. We have good news for you, though. When your light comes on, your car is simply telling you that you need more air in your tire and this time of year, the warning is usually related to chilly nights. Here’s wh ... read more

Categories:

Tires

Winter Tire Sipes

To better decide what kind of a tire you need, it’s wise to understand how traction works. We would all like a tire that grips well year-round in all conditions, wears well and is inexpensive. That tire does not exist because many of the things that we want in one tire are engineering contradictions. On a microscopic level, a tire is not smooth. The tread face looks like the Rocky Mountains – sharp, jagged peaks and deep valleys between them create a hostile-looking surface. That’s good because the road surface is not smooth, either – it mimics the contours of the tire tread. These two rough surfaces interlock, the tire rotates and there is grip to move the car forward. And to ensure that the rubber fills in the road surface, it needs to be soft.That means the ideal tire is just a big, black, soft rubber ball. But wait – we want the tire to last, so we cannot make it as soft as is ideal. That would be a racing slick: extremely grippy for a very short ... read more

Categories:

Tires

Winter Tire Minus Sizing gets true cold weather performance

Winter Tire MINUS SIZING Gets true PERFORMANCE FOR OUR WINTER SEASON. Original Equipment tire and wheel sizes have become larger and wider for better looks and performance in the last few years. Unfortunately these new performance based packages are not ideal for winter driving. So if you’re likely to drive your vehicle in the snow during winter, you’ll want tires and wheels in sizes that help put the laws of physics on your side by “minus” sizing. What is Minus Sizing? Minus sizing means using smaller diameter wheels with narrower, higher profile tires (but still maintaining your vehicles original equipment needs). By doing so, better deep snow traction is achieved, and can also result in great savings on Winter Tire & Wheel Packages. In addition, higher profile tire sizes feature taller sidewalls and smaller diameter wheels that resist damages associated with winter road hazards. Benefits of Minus Sizing Minus sizing packages can be created through our ... read more

Categories:

Tires

Engine Coolant Technology - Cold Climate Needs

An Introduction to Coolant Technology What is Engine Coolant and What Does It Do? An engine coolant is a heat transfer fluid designed to remove excess heat from an internal combustion engine. It also serves to prevent freezing and most importantly protection from corrosion. An operating engine typically converts only one third of the energy derived through the combustion of fuel into work that moves the vehicle. The other two thirds is converted into heat, of which one third goes out with the exhaust. This leaves the remaining third in the engine block, necessitating the need for a coolant to adsorb this heat, transport it to the radiator and dissipate it into to the environment. Through the removal of this heat by the coolant fluid, the engine is able to operate in an efficient manner. Therefore engine coolant is a generic term used to describe fluids that remove heat from an engine, in effect “cooling” the engine. Not all fluids are efficient heat tran ... read more

Categories:

Maintenance

Hot weather affects battery life

When you think of a dead car battery, you probably think about it being the dead of winter. You try to start your car one frigid morning and nothing happens. It's true that battery failures can occur in cold weather but that's not usually what has caused the problem. The drain on the battery's resources most likely occurred during the summer's hot weather. According to the Car Care Council a group representing automotive repair shops, your battery is more likely to fail in summer than in winter. "Summer heat is the real culprit," said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. "Many battery problems start long before the temperatures drop. Heat, more than cold, shortens battery life." Doesn't last forever No battery lasts forever. When you buy one, the label usually tells you how long you can expect it to last. Five to 7 years is not unusual as long as the battery is operated under normal conditions. Extremely hot weather and overcha ... read more

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Maintenance

Increased safety with working signal and brake lights

The Long and Lighted Road: Lighting and Driving Brake and Turn Signals Automotive Signal Lights Although motorists often complain that some drivers don't know they exist or how to use them, all cars these days come equipped with blinking turn signals letting the car behind you know what you're up to. That certainly wasn't the case with the earliest cars, though. I still remember drivers using standard hand signals into the early sixties — you know, the ones you had to learn to pass your driver's test: for left you put your left arm straight out the window parallel to the ground, for right you rested your left elbow on the window, raising your forearm up with your hand open. And if you wanted to stop you signaled that intention, as well, by putting your left arm out parallel to the road and angling it downward. These hand signals were required whether it was sunny and fair or pouring buckets. Drivers of early historical cars, in fact, still have to know and use ... read more

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Safety